Made in Britain season: all five reviews

Over the last month I’ve had a lot of fun watching the all-too-brief Made in Britain season, which saw a bunch of homegrown film gems get a big screen outing across the country. The pleasingly eclectic choices saw comedy happily rub shoulders with sci-fi and horror – genres too often overlooked when it comes to …

Review: Quatermass and the Pit (1967)

A jewel in the crown of British science-fiction, QUATERMASS AND THE PIT remains as taut and enthralling today as it was when first released over 40 years ago. Hammer’s third and final adaptation of the classic BBC TV series from genre mastermind Nigel Kneale deals with themes not too dissimilar from those of 2001: A …

Review: Hobson’s Choice (1954)

A truly Great British romance as well as a deliciously unconventional romantic comedy, HOBSON’S CHOICE remains a treat nearly 60 years after it first arrived on our screens. Showing as part of the ‘Made in Britain’ season, this is arguably a story that could only have been made in this country. Its working class, northern …

Review: The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

Eschewing the conventional, Nicolas Roeg’s stylish adaptation of Walter Tevis’ sci-fi novel is more often than not a rewarding experience, tempered only by occasional overindulgence. Where one might expect Hollywood spectacle the film offers abstract imagery, and instead of tugging at the heartstrings Roeg delivers sex, sex and more sex. It’s surely a film that …

Review: The Plague of the Zombies (1966)

Anyone attracted by the throat-grabbing title and hoping for lashings of brain-munching action should look elsewhere: Hammer’s undead thriller from 1966 is a much tamer affair than today’s audiences might expect. But those who are more familiar with Hammer’s full-blooded style should find much to enjoy. THE PLAGUE OF THE ZOMBIES is one of those …